The First 2 Mlm Sales Principles You Must Apply To Your Business

Fact is, the sales profession has incredibly high demand. The reason? There are a couple factors that have made the job market this way. First off, with the recent struggling economy, brave Americans have been pushed towards the entrepreneurial route and developing small businesses. What has been the ultimate factor in profit? The number of sales that the company gathers, which is directly affected by the number of salespeople the company has employed. Second, a profession in sales is one of the hardest to fill; quite frankly, many people are naturally lazy. How many friends do you know that are dedicated, consistent, hard working people who don’t mind working 10-11 hours a day? That’s what a typical day of a sales job entails. Third, job seekers do not like the sound of a commission only job. It’s incredibly weird that people try to stay away from commission jobs. Commission means unlimited income based on your efforts. It makes perfect sense to me. Fourth, it is impossible to replicate sales skills; therefore, it is hard to duplicate. Every person has their own unique personality and develops their own way of doing things. Sales is an art, not an easy step by step process. To sum it all up, learning how to create a situation where somebody takes their money and gives it to you is one of the most difficult skills on Earth. Thankfully, there is a set of sales principles that every experienced salesperson follows. I, myself, as an experienced door-to-door and telemarketing salesman have done the same. Let’s dig deep into them:

1. The sales process. The passing of time and advancement in technology has forced a change in America’s culture. Unfortunately, not many Americans moved along with this newfound culture. With this change came the shift in mentality of the basic “sales process.” The early sales process consisted of just seven simple steps: introduce, qualify, present, overcome objections, close, rehash, referral, and follow up. Now, the sales process consists of: awareness, interest, research, evaluation, commitment, referral, and follow up. Every step speaks for itself in terms of its purpose. But don’t take this first principle lightly, as it is what gives you a concrete foundational mindset on what you need to achieve with your customers. How do the early and current sales processes differ? The early sales process was used more for traditional marketing like door-to-door and telemarketing. The evolved sales process is used for current, more efficient marketing tactics including attraction marketing.
2. The 4 factors of impulse. There are different versions of the 4 factors of impulse but they all have the same meaning. Variations include FIGS, FUGI, and GUFI. However, the most popular version of the acronym is FUJI (probably because of the popularity of Mount Fuji). To break it down, FUJI stands for fear of loss, urgency, jones effect, and indifference. What the factors of impulse do to a customer is truly powerful and can give you the competitive edge over other salespeople if used correctly and consistently. Fear of loss happens when the customer feels that he will lose out on this once-in-a-lifetime opportunity. If he doesn’t act now, he’ll miss out forever! Urgency ties in with fear of loss, but has to deal more with having a respect for your customer’s time. Make sure to tell your customer that your message won’t take long. Remember, you only have about the first 9 seconds to interest a potential lead. The Jones effect is a well-known rule that states people naturally want what other people want, especially if they know them on a more personal level like neighbors, friends, family, and colleagues. Indifference has been the new form of sales. It takes the focus off of the sale and puts it more on the customer service approach. You want to make the customer feel comfortable and being indifferent will do the trick. You probably noticed that other variations had a “G” instead of a “J.” The “G” stands for greed, which displays that people are naturally greedy and want what everyone else wants. Greed and the Jones effect are very synonymous. Apply these four factors and build the level of impulse throughout the sales process to make the customer think, “I need to buy it now!”